I majored in Fine Art with an emphasis in Photography and spent endless hours in the darkroom developing my photos. Nothing compared to watching an image I shot slowly appear on paper in the developer. It was like magic and it was my favorite part of the entire process. By the time I graduated, digital photography had already become mainstream and part of me panicked because in all my years studying photography, I had never picked up a digital camera. I honestly didn’t know anything about it and it broke my heart to hear people say that film was dead. I didn’t want to believe it but I felt like in order to be successful I needed to change. Over time I shot less film and then virtually none at all, but when it comes to photography, film has always been my true love.

A few weeks ago I purchased Canon’s last model of professional film cameras and got to work with a talented team of creatives on an editorial boudoir session. The entire shoot was shot on film and I can’t even begin to describe how elated I felt for those two hours. It was like visiting with an old friend and even though it’s been years since you’ve last seen each other your connection is so strong that it feels like it was just yesterday the two of you were hanging out. That’s how I would describe my relationship with film. I never pictured myself as a boudoir film photographer, but after this editorial, I can’t wait to incorporate more of these sessions into my workflow. This is only part 1 of this editorial session so stay tuned for part 2 in the coming weeks!

PhotoVision || Bash & Bloom || The Outer Edge  || The Mrs Box || Bella Belle Shoes || Katie

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I have a deep love for garden weddings. They probably top my list of favorite wedding locations. They are intimate and charming and tend to create such a lovely and laid back vibe to the day. They make me feel a bit nostalgic as well given that Carl and I were married in one. I guess you can say I’m a little biased, but honestly, they’re great. Seattle brides, if you have been dreaming of a backyard wedding but lack the backyard space then The Admiral’s House Seattle wedding venue is for you. This historic property is in one of Seattle’s loveliest neighborhoods, and is the ideal location for a garden wedding. The property is beautiful and the house itself will make all of your friends and family feel at home. Your guests will also be treated to an outdoor reception with spectacular views of Seattle’s skyline and beautiful Mount Rainier that just can’t be beat.

I had been dreaming of shooting a wedding at The Admiral’s House since we first arrived in Seattle not only for the outdoor space, but also the charming house on the property. The natural light throughout the house makes it the ideal location for getting ready photos, which is something I recommend all of my couples pay close attention to when they are deciding on a getting ready location. As a natural light photographer, I cannot emphasize enough the importance of having an abundance of natural light during this part of your day. The Admiral’s House is also just a quick drive from some of my favorite local spots for portraits.

From beginning to end, Alex and Brett’s wedding was full of energy, excitement and tender moments. One of my fondest memories from their wedding day was when one of Alex’s bridesmaids sang during the ceremony. It was such a special tribute to their friendship and loving bond. When it comes to summers in Seattle, outdoor receptions are a must. Long days and warm nights go perfectly with heartwarming toasts and dancing under twinkling lights. And there isn’t a better way to end the night than with donuts. Thank you Jenna Bechtholt Photography for having me along to assist with this gorgeous summer wedding.PinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPinPin

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